QD Syringe – The Low Dead Space Syringe

Posted on September 29, 2016. Filed under: Syringe Blog | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

qd-syringe-with-bilateral-glyflo-technology-1

The QD Syringe drastically cuts the waste of costly medications down by over 89%, leaving just a scant 18 microliters of residual volume behind. This is a massive money-saving benefit to the healthcare industry and consumers.

Christopher Green designed the Bilateral QD GlyfloTechnology™ for the QD Syringe. The uniquely patented cone-shaped tip has bilateral fluid flow channels and a bilateral orifice. This new design also greatly reduces the risks of needle sticks by medical professionals, reduces the spread of infectious diseases, and saves tremendously on medication waste with its low residual volume design and guarantees delivering a less painful injection to the patient.

The Low Dead Space Syringe – Low Residual Volume Syringe

Syringe with Integrated Cannula – Patent # 9,295,788

 

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What is a Healthcare GPO?

Posted on April 28, 2012. Filed under: Syringe Blog | Tags: , , , , |

What is a Healthcare GPO?

Health Care GPO’s

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Low “Dead Space” Syringes Could Save Your Life

Posted on February 2, 2012. Filed under: Syringe Blog | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Another guest article from Jamie Bridge this week. This time he’s writing about some of the work of researcher Dr. William Zule, looking into how the type of syringe someone uses may have an inpact on their risk of getting the HIV virus. I have had this article a few weeks but it was embargoed until the AIDS2010 conference started as its finding are being presented there.

How syringe type effects HIV risk

New research being presented this week at the International AIDS Conference in Vienna has made a strong link between different types of syringe and levels of HIV transmission through sharing.

Every needle-syringe, when the plunger is fully depressed, retains some fluid or blood in what is termed “dead-space”. Some syringe designs have more of this “dead space” than others – especially those with detachable needles. Depending on the design, some syringes can retain 84 microlitres of fluid. This is a very, very small amount – but other syringe designs can retain as little as 2 microlitres.

So the hypothesis is simple: if you share a syringe with higher “dead-space”, then there will be more blood retained in the syringe and you will be more likely to become infected with blood-borne viruses. If you share a low “dead space” syringe, you are still putting yourself at risk – but perhaps less so, as there is less blood retained when the plunger is fully down.

Previous modelling work by Dr William Zule and colleagues in the USA tried to quantify what this could mean in the real world. The results suggested that injection-related HIV epidemics might not occur when most (95% or more) of injectors use syringes with low “dead space”. If everyone uses higher “dead space” syringes, then HIV prevalence can reach 50% among injectors in just seventeen years. When just one in ten sharing events involve high “dead space” syringes, then HIV prevalence can stabilise.

The findings, albeit theoretical, have clear implications for harm reduction programs. However, in Vienna, the research has been taken to the next level. Data from multi-year HIV prevalence studies were gathered from 35 cities in 20 countries, and local needle exchange workers were contacted to find out what types of syringe were mainly used.

In cities where high “dead space” syringes were mainly used, the average HIV prevalence among injectors was 32.6% (and went up as high as 73%). In cities where low “dead space” syringes were mainly used, the average was just 1.4%. When the data were analyzed, the type of syringe was the only factor closely associated with this pattern in HIV.

More research needs to be done on this topic, and expect to hear a lot more about this in the future – this is an important finding which could have a big impact on harm reduction and the advice given to injectors. Of course, the biggest message is that ALL needle-syringe sharing is a risk. However, if we could reduce HIV transmission simply by providing one kind of syringe over another, then this is something that must be rolled out as soon as possible. Do you know what kind of syringe your local exchange supplies?

A big thank you to Dr William Zule for sharing this research.

Jamie Bridge, MSc, currently works in the Technical Publications and Learning Team of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. Before moving to Geneva in 2010, he worked for the International Harm Reduction Association in London, coordinating the international harm reduction conferences. Before that, he also worked in a needle and syringe program in Bedford. Jamie also works voluntarily with UKHRA and the NNEF.

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Potentially dangerous needlestick injuries often go unreported

Posted on January 4, 2012. Filed under: Syringe Blog | Tags: , , , , , , |

Johns Hopkins research suggests least-skilled providers at risk for life-threatening infections

Medical students are commonly stuck by needles – putting them at risk of contracting potentially dangerous blood-borne diseases – and many of them fail to report the injuries to hospital authorities, according to a Johns Hopkins study published in the December issue of the journal Academic Medicine.

Researchers surveyed surgery residents at 17 medical centers and, of 699 respondents, 415 (or 59 percent) said they had sustained a needlestick injury as a medical student. Many said they were stuck more than once. Of the surgeons-in-training whose most recent needlestick occurred in medical school, nearly half of them did not report their injury to an employee health office, thereby avoiding an evaluation as to whether they needed treatment to prevent HIV or hepatitis C.

It is estimated that 600,000 to 800,000 needlesticks and other similar injuries are reported annually among U.S. health care workers and there is evidence of vast underreporting, says Martin A. Makary, M.D., M.P.H., an associate professor of surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and lead researcher for the study.”Medical schools are not doing enough to protect their students and hospitals are not doing enough to make medical school safe,” he says. “We, as a medical community, are putting our least skilled people on the front lines in the most high-risk situations. Most trainees are still forced to learn to sew and stitch on patients, which puts both providers and patients at risk.”

Makary says medical schools should take advantage of advances in simulation technology and do less training on actual human beings until they are more skilled.

The authors of the study believe that needlesticks go unreported due to cumbersome reporting procedures, fears about poor clinical evaluations by their by their superiors, or embarrassment. The most commonly given reason in the study for why the medical students didn’t report needle injuries was the amount of time involved in making a report.

The survey did find, however, that medical students were very likely (92 percent) to report the needlestick if the patient was at high risk for having a virus like HIV or hepatitis, compared with 47 percent of injuries involving low-risk patients. Still, prompt reporting of all needlestick injuries is critical to ensuring proper medical prophylaxis, counseling and legal precautions, Makary says. Very few people who follow proper protocol and seek treatment after a needlestick get sick, he says.

“Hospitals are not creating a culture of speaking up,” says Makary, who is also the Mark Ravitch Chair of Gastrointestinal Surgery and director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Surgical Outcomes Research. “If people are not speaking up regarding their own safety concerns, it’s probably a surrogate marker of people not speaking up about patient safety concerns.”

Most of the needlesticks among medical students were self-inflicted and occurred in the operating room when the student felt rushed.

Makary says that needlestick injuries in surgery can infect patients since the providers’ blood can enter the patient’s wound. He argues that hospitals need to create a culture of reporting errors and stop placing their newest trainees at the greatest risk for infection. He also says that since medical students are at significant risk of personal injury during clinical training, more needs to be done to educate them about the importance of reporting any needlesticks, the value of post-exposure treatment and on how to prevent future injuries.

At The Johns Hopkins Hospital, for example, a hotline has been instituted for all occupational blood exposures. After such a report is received, a rapid response team is activated to deliver appropriate care while preserving confidentiality. The study was supported by the Mr. and Mrs. Chad Richison Foundation and the Lotus Global Health Foundation.

Source: Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions

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